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HAIR TALES : MY “OWN” EXPERIENCE

HAIR TALES : MY “OWN” EXPERIENCE

Introduction I was invited to a special screening of “Hair Tales” a chronicle of the black hair journey, presented by coproducer Oprah Winfrey.

The complexities of ethnic hair are illustrated in the documentary.

The documentary, which weaves together the stories of many different women with different hair textures and styles and is directed by three black women, looks at the complexities of black hair in America. “I think the most interesting thing about this project — what I feel is most important — is that it’s being told by black filmmakers for black audiences,” said the director “We wanted to show what African-American women go through dealing with their hair on a daily basis.”

The film has been in production for some time and was inspired by a conversation between two friends who discussed how they were both on the same journey with their hair: “If only we could talk to other women like us,” they thought.

I was invited to a special screening of “Hair Tales” a chronicle of the black hair journey, presented by coproducer Oprah Winfrey.

I was invited to a special screening of “Hair Tales” a chronicle of the black hair journey, presented by coproducer Oprah Winfrey. The film chronicles the entire history of African American hair and how it’s been perceived throughout history. From slavery to the Civil Rights Movement, through natural hair movement today. It also touches on other cultures that have experienced similar issues with their own hair.

So why did I say yes?

So why did I say yes? Well for one, it was about black women and their hair. I’m not sure if you’re familiar with this concept of “good hair” but if you are then I think we can agree that it’s a myth. In my opinion it’s also a form of racism against black people who have natural hair. And there are many reasons why I believe this so strongly but as far as the documentary goes, they talk about the beauty industry denial of natural hair products on shelves and how different types of black girls are taught to hate what comes naturally from their heads when they should be proud that they have such amazing texture!

Well for one, it was about black women and their hair.

Well for one, it was about black women and their hair. It is important that we – especially as black women in a community where our beauty is constantly under attack – have spaces to discuss issues that are specific to our experience. The Black Hair Chronicles was created by naturalistas as a platform to celebrate our kinks, coils, curls and waves while also addressing the many issues we face when it comes to how we care for them. As a woman who has been on the journey of growing her hair out from an afro into long locs herself, I could relate very much with what my peers shared with me on this Facebook page when it first started gaining popularity in 2011.

I am all about learning and supporting films made by black women for black women.

I am all about learning and supporting films made by black women for black women. We are the most beautiful women in the world and we should support each other and our stories. Black women filmmakers, producers, directors, editors, etc. need help getting their voices heard because there is so much competition out here for work opportunities. The idea Hair Tales is that no matter how much time has passed since slavery ended or how much progress we’ve made as African Americans or people of color; many things have not changed for us or our hair when it comes to working with folks who believe they know better than us what works best for us as individuals—and it shouldn’t be this way!

The documentary is intended to center around the complex relationships black women have with their hair.

Hair Tales is a documentary film by black women, for black women. It’s intended to center around the complex relationships black women have with their hair—and how those relationships translate beyond our own heads, into how we navigate the world as a whole. The film was be launched in October the team behind this project hopes that it’ll spark more conversations about representation in media—as well as empower other Black women to stand up for themselves when they see something that makes them uncomfortable or doesn’t accurately reflect who they are.

It promises to give a behind-the-scenes look into the world of South Florida’s hairstyling industry with a cast of characters that includes beauty entrepreneurs, stylists, salon owners and customers.

Private VIP event gave a behind-the-scenes look into the world of South Florida’s hairstyling industry with a cast of characters that includes beauty entrepreneurs, influencers, radio personalities, salon owners, and customers. The documentary covers all kinds of hair: straight, wavy, curly and textured. It also showcases women who have been in the business for years as well as those looking to break into it. The film will explore what it means when your hair is part of your identity and how community plays an important role in maintaining good health.

I heard some exciting stories in the conversations at my table and although there were very different perspectives on hair (relaxed vs natural), there was no judgment or disparaging remarks.

The group of women in the room was diverse in age, race, and hair type. We were all excited about the film and supportive of each other. I overheard some of the conversations from other tables and there were very different perspectives on hair (relaxed vs natural). However, there was no judgment or disparaging remarks. In fact, everyone seemed to be on board with the idea that this would be an educational opportunity for women who want to learn more about their own hair journey. I think it’s important to note that although we have our own experiences with our hair– whether it’s curly or straight–the conversation doesn’t have to stop there. We can also share stories with one another so that we can help shape how others view us as well as ourselves!

My OWN ExperienceI have a story about my own experience with my hair. I have been natural for 5 years, Siterlocks to be exact and I have tried many different styles. One of the most difficult parts of transitioning was learning to love my locks and embrace my natural hair. This was very hard because this “4C” hair texture gave me a lifetime of hard lessons. Now my hair is bae and I love it. It represents freedom, love, and authenticity for me!

There are many ways to cultivate our self-love as black women. One way is learning to love your hair.

There are many ways to cultivate our self-love as black women.

One way is learning to love your hair. It can be as simple as making a conscious decision not to wear weaves or wigs, or it could be more involved than that. For example, if you feel like your hair is damaged and unhealthy, it’s time to stop putting chemicals in it and start nurturing what you have by using natural products instead of chemical ones—and then continue doing so for the rest of your life! You don’t need permission from anyone else; just make whatever choices feel right for YOU and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!

Conclusion

My advice to anyone interested in learning more about their hair or creating a business around it would be to check out this documentary. The film is currently available on Hulu, so you can watch it after work tonight!

Michelle Rhodes

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